Do your social media look like this?

You’re someplace with a bunch of people… …on a lunch break at a conference, seated at a table with people you don’t know… …in line at a coffee shop that you go to all the time. There are a few regulars there you recognize… …in a classroom, and you’re the instructor… …in the stands of a sold-out ballgame… …and what comes out of your mouth in those situations looks like your social media feed. Is this what you’d want your in-person social interactions to look like? Why or why not?...

Do we have a “conversation versus publication” problem?

If you and I were having lunch and I did all the talking, what would you think? Even if what I was saying was interesting to you, at best you’d think I had something to say. What you wouldn’t think, however, is that I got to know you one iota. At worst you’d think of me as an unselfish, if not egotistical boob. And if my goal was to really connect with you, I be failing in my mission. In context, the expectation would be conversation. In conversation, listening, not talking, is how I connect and learn and make you feel valued. The world we live in is different technologically, but not socially. I could be talking to you on the phone — a real time modality — and accomplish the same failure by doing all the talking. The problem with a lot of social media is that it’s not exactly social. A host of gurus want to tell you how to put social media on auto-pilot. Except that we’ve already established the conversation, not publication, is the more powerful means to connectorship. Except that we’ve already established that since the world is noisier than it’s ever been, it’s dang near impossible to “talk” in enough to cut through the noise. Except that we already know, because we all live it every day, that being interrupted is a terribly low efficiency way to get attention, let alone build trust. There is a time to publish information. There’s a time to write a book or blog post or post something on LinkedIn. There’s a time to publish a stream of...

The Connectorship Angle – Interview with Michael Santarcangelo (@catalyst)

Michael Santarcangelo (@catalyst) is the real deal. You may find him on the web talking about technology security, but in this show you’ll also hear about his background (non-technical!) and why he thinks we need to take the friction out of communication. Join us as we discuss training, agency, and changes happening in the world of communicating. Download the MP3 (you may need to right click to download), or watch the video or listen below....